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nkel follows the second ever treat on c- max next, a discussion of the state of american education. then connecticut governor donal malloy talks about early childhood education programs in his state. speaksan manuel santos about his country' trade agreement with the u.s.. >> in a recent ranking of students around the world, the u.s. failed to score in the top 20 of reading, math, and science. randi weingarten says that that is because the u.s. has a higher poverty rate than other developed countries. hour.s just over one >> our guest is randi weingarten, president of the american federation of teachers. this is her first visit with the group. she got an early look at the joys of helping children learn to turn mother was a teacher. she earned degrees from cornell university and a law degree from cardozo school of law. she worked at a wall street law form -- law firm for several years. she taught in brooklyn while serving as counsel for the president of the united federation of teachers. she served as president for 12 years before her election as a ft president in 2008. that ends the
coalition now? >> ok, so when you poll the public on things like education, jobs -- people want good jobs. people want the american dream. if you look at doug sosnik's recent blog post, which i think was not in "atlantic" but in "politico"? sorry. i think it is totally right that one of the great unifying factors in this country was if you work hard, and play by a set of fairness rules, you should do ok. and our guidepost was -- are our kids, the next generation, are they doing better than we are? that has changed. and people are really anxious about that. they want to work hard and they want to do ok. so i think there is -- when i looked at the elections, in 2013, chris christie won in new jersey, that is true, but so did minimum wage expansion. terry mcauliffe won in virginia, walsh in boston, deblasio in new york. toledo, the person who was pro- public education -- >> could you speak up? >> sorry. the person who was pro-education won. so there is something going on in the country that is about, yes, working hard. nobody wants a handout. but let's level the playing field so we have grea
competition we were not doing very well, and we were not educating our children to the level we needed to remain competitive. it had almost nothing to do with the federal government at the outset. up rockas been a tactic of barack obama himself adopting this common core. a survey in connecticut, 72% of teachers, we are talking about literacy --e, embrace it. only two percent or three percent inc. it will lead to lower or worse results. others are not taking up position. when you have that embracing of a concept and teachers and administrators have had the time to look at what people want to inhasize, they are moving the right direction. we have seen no movement to abandon our common core. we need to hold ourselves accountable for success. >> it you think about the common core? what are the key strengths? about thenything implementation you are nervous about? >> there are fewer things but deeper. the ability to use those things we are learning successfully. whether it is in support of or inal thinking mathematics being able to answer promptly, i think that is the real strength. i think
millions of other families that, what's wrong with mom? it was not the education about alcoholism and drug dependency that there is now. it took dad -- dad searched through several doctors before finding a doctor that had the courage to say your wife's an alcoholic. that was not just the image anybody accepted. found the right doctor, dad -- excuse me -- had the courage to say we're going to do this intervention, the whole family went in, did the intervention with mom, and, you know, at that time, i never heard the word "intervention," and now you got tv shows that do it. it was a different time. we did it. dad led the intervention, and my memory of that is very clear. he walked in the door that morning, all the kids, dad, surprised mom, took her hand and said, betty, we're here because we love you, the kids want their mother back, i want my wife back, and those interventions are tough. i mean, that is tough, hard, hard, hard work. a lot of tears. a lot of crying. a lot of raised voices. a lot of hugs, more raised voices, denial, and not denial, and i mean, it goes back and forth. it's a t
of the american federation of teachers, spoke about the report. she spoke about the efforts to improve education. hosted by the christian science monitor. this is just over one hour. >> our guest is randi weingarten, president of the american federation of teachers. this is her first visit with the group. she got an early look at the joys of helping children learn since her mother was a teacher. she earned degrees from cornell university and a law degree from cardozo school of law. she worked at a wall street law firm for several years. she taught history in brooklyn while serving as counsel for the president of the united federation of teachers. she served as president for 12 years before her election as aft president in 2008. that ends the biographical portion of the program. as always, we are on the record here. please no live blogging or tweeting or other means of filing well this is underway. there is no embargo on the breakfast. our friends at c-span have agreed not to air video of the session until one hour after the breakfast is over to give reporters time to file. give me a nonthreateni
rankings were based on e tests of more than half a million 15-year-olds. the u.s. education secretary arnie duncan calling it stagnation. but before we talk about how to fix the problem, let's look deeper. there might be a lot less here than meets the eye. they're broken down in connecticut, florida, and massachusetts. in connecticut and massachusetts, two of the richest states in the union were students generally perform better than the worldwide average. the policy substitute said that america lags in social testing. if you were to correct for their massive income inequality, the performance is better than it appears. consider that the top issuer in all three categories was shanghai, a result that gave rise to headlines proclaiming china has having the smartest students. they are just 1.7% of china's population. country, essentially forces many of the children of poor workers to leave shanghai for high school. while testing was done three years ago in china's rural areas, the chinese government only allowed the release of shanghai's scores. it underlies almost every conversation we have a
done a study for the department of education and submitted a report which was lost somewhere in the department of education. later, u.s. news and world report tried to track it down. wasn't able to do it. professor judith kleinfilled called and it wasn't exactly 8-1, reporters at the time, the boston globe, as they reported the statistic that is true, parents were told -- much more voluble, and shrinking violence. exactly the opposite is true. the typical classroom, no one calls on them. it is true boys get more attention, more careful research, it was negative attention. boys are more unruly or the teacher will say the president of france, johnny is not listening, there are more reprimands but more positive engagement comment in fact fairly good data from the department of education that they feel they have a right to express their opinions and if the teacher wants to hear what they have to say and far fewer boys feel that way. >> host: that leads into your second book "the war against boys: how misguided policies are harming our young men". just updated this year. the new e
. and by the time i was engaging with the gender educators, i learned that you must always check the data. and i just couldn't find it. he did not appear that the research was anywhere that this factoid was documented. and it turned out that he had done a study for the department of education and it was lost somewhere in the department of education. later, she wasn't able to do it, the professor did a follow-up and he admitted that it wasn't exactly 81, it was less a matter something like that. but none of that, for some reason, the reporters of the time, including "the washington post", they reported this statistic as true. boys were treated much more respectfully and valuable and they assert themselves and girls are sort of lacking balance. that is exactly the opposite was true. a typical classroom, the boys are often sitting in the back to spring the known cause on them and it's true that they may get more attention in some cases, but more careful research shows that it's negative attention at times because boys are more unruly and so the teacher will say, who do you think is the president of
home offer access to everything from education, to health care, to a safe shelter from the streets, which means that you're harnessing the power of community to expand opportunity for folks here in d.c. and your work reflects a tradition that runs through our history -- a belief that we're greater together than we are on our own. and that's what i've come here to talk about today. over the last two months, washington has been dominated by some pretty contentious debates i think that's fair to say. and between a reckless shutdown by congressional republicans in an effort to repeal the affordable care act, and admittedly poor execution on my administration's part in implementing the latest stage of the new law, nobody has acquitted themselves very well these past few months. so it's not surprising that the american people's frustrations with washington are at an all- time high. but we know that people's frustrations run deeper than these most recent political battles. their frustration is rooted in their own daily battles -- to make ends meet, to pay for college, buy a home, save for
people are coming and make sure they check in. we do find education is a key way of protecting children. if you get children into school, it's a daily mechanism for teachers and outside people check are they withdrawing? are they fed properly? do they need other things? behind the greatest protection is to make sure the schooling us back and get kids back in school. whether they are moving to family site for schools and apollo would be key for the future. but the support for recovery phase, shelter is going to be a key area. we were lucky the church actors have been trained in disaster risk reduction. they knew how to register, how to do triage in certain areas. we need to continue processes is philippines continue to be hit by bigger and bigger storms would need to focus on the science of communities. i would also propose we strengthen the emergency response capacity of the local mission. i know ms. steele has been strong the development aspect of supportive of the construction efforts that have gone there. i don't think they have the team and staff to respond to a three to five-year e
. they had been offering a manufacturing education program for 12 years and had 98% to 100% placement rate. we have 12 community colleges. it makes no sense in a state that is number two per capita in submarines and construction. almost all of it is high-value added as opposed to lower value added. we were not reshaping our schools to produce the human capital. >> did you find out why not? >> yes, it was outside the box. it was outside people's educational box. we now have added three additional community colleges. that model is being used to rebuild the high schools, which the state runs. yes, we are changing. >> thank you, i really appreciate it. i want to thank you for all the school safety measures. rick alluded to secretary duncan's piece. has the federal government become irrelevant to the work you are doing, or is there a role the federal government can play that complements your role? -- complements the role the state and local government can play? >> let's go back to the comments about the $100 million grant program. even if you don't get one of those grants, it is a learning expe
that poverty because she lumberjacks a decent education or a health care or a community that views her future as their own it should offend all of us. the combined trends of declining mobility it poses a threat to our way of life. what drives me as a zbroond, a son, a father, as an american is to make sure that every striving hard-working optimistic kid in america has the same incredible chance that this country gave me. >> the current minimum wage is $7.25, adjusted for inflation. that's more than $3 less than the minimum wage was back in 1968. president obama said he'll support a senate bill to increase the minimum wage to $10.10 but not going to be easy. >> what would the prospects of that be not only in the senate but the house? >> they are not good. it would be easier to do that than to increase taxes on the wealthy at this point in time because that's been ruled off the table by congressional republicans. if you're going after inequality with those brunt instrument, minimum wage would be easier to do. income in equality, the historical trends are staggering. with respect to fast food wo
there. he'll be talking about education policy. [inaudible conversations] >> hey, good afternoon, everyone. we're going to go ahead and get started. hey, how you doing this afternoon? i'm rick hess, director of education policy studies here at the american enterprise institute. happy to welcome all of you to join us today for this promising and, i think, intriguing conversation with connecticut governor dan malloy. delighted to have those of you who are here with us and also those of you watching at home either via live stream or on c-span2. the hashtag for the event is hashtag ct ed reform, that's capital ct ed reform. feel free to follow along or join in. we are going to be going for an hour, until 2:30. format's going to be pretty straightforward. first, governor malloy, dan malloy of connecticut, has been kind enough to agree to share some thoughts on the dos and don'ts of school reform in connecticut, what are some of the lessons they've learned as they have tackled this work. i'm going to then have an opportunity to chat with the governor for 15 or 20 minutes, ask him a cou
much. >> thank you. >> thank you. >> >> woodruff: next, how the american education system stacks up in global rankings and the questions surrounding that assessment. jeffrey brown has the story. >> brown: it's considered by many the world's most important exam. the program for international student assessment, or "pisa" test, has been given to 15-year- olds in 65 countries every three years since 2000. a way to test and compare performances in reading, math and science. results from 2012 were released today, and, once again, the u.s. hovered near the middle of the pack, lagging in some areas even as other countries advanced. math remains the biggest challenge. 29 other systems had higher average scores than american high schoolers. the u.s. fared better in reading, where it ranked 20th, and in science, ranking 23rd. the best results were in east asia, where students from shanghai, singapore, south korea and japan, among others, placed near the top. pisa results also showed another concern for american teens as well: a smaller percentage of them reached the top levels of proficiency.
have been older workers, workers of color and workers with less education. and that's not particularly surprising because these are the workers who, even in a robust economy, experience the greatest difficult in getting jobs in the first place for a variety of reasons including discrimination. the very fact of long-term unemployment is affecting these workers' ability to get new jobs. i know many of you are co-sponsors on legislation that would prohibit discrimination against the long-term unemployed which is certainly a measure we would also encourage you to take up as soon as you can. but today's focus is obviously on extending the benefits. finally, i want to stress again the importance of renewing the program, not just because of the workers who will be affected, and you will hear from them, but for the economy overall, for the labor market overall and for our society overall. as congressman levin again pointed out this morning, we know that unemployment insurance is one of the most effective economic stimuli that we have. cbo said if the program is renewed, it could account for as
then public, on things like education, jobs, people want good jobs. people want the american dream. if you look at the muscles in the -- if you look at doug post,ck's recent blog which i think was not in "atlantic" but it "politico"? sorry. thatnk it is totally right one of the great unifying factors in this country was if by a sethard, and play of fairness rules, you should do ok. kids,r guidepost for our the next generation, are they doing better than they are. that has changed. and people are really anxious about that. they want to work hard and they want to do ok. so i think there is -- when i looked at the elections, in new, chris christie won in jersey, that is true, but so did minimum wage expansion. virginia,liffe won in walsh in boston, palacios in new york. the person who was protested education -- >> could you speak up? >> the person who was pro- education won. so there is something going on in the country that is about, yes, working hard. nobody wants a handout. but let's level the playing field so we have great public education and we have ways for people to enter or reenter o
, for the first time we're actually budgeting continuing -- state dollars for continuing education. as we urge people to change their aroach to continuing education -- approach to continuing education from a kind of large auditorium, you know, you close the school for a day, you headache everybody hear the same lecture and precious little chance for real discussion between teachers and those that are leading the discussion. we're trying to change that model as well to be supportive of the kind of broader and larger change that we want to see made in the school systems across the state. >> so how much per pupil is spent in connecticut today? >> um, it varies widely. from district to district. it is one of the largest state programs, that is a kind of distribution of dollars in the education cost-sharing grant allocation. no district has lost any money since i've become governor, but the vast majority of the additional dollars have gone to those districts most in need. and that is a break with the it's. previously, if you put additional money into the education cost-sharing grant fund, it would
that is done here. and all the non-profits that call the arc home offer access to everything from education to health care to the safe shelter from the streets. which means you're harnessing the power of community. to expand opportunity for folks here in d.c. and your reflects the tradition that run through our history. the blood vessel we're greater together than on our own. over the last two months washington has been dominated by some contentious debates. i think it's fair to say. and between a reckless shut down by congressional republicans in an effort to repeal the affordable care act, and admitly poor execution on my administration's part on implementing the latest stage of the new law. it's not surprising the frustrations with the are at the all-time high. we know the frustrations run deeper than the most recent political battles. their frustration is rooted in their own daily battles fop make ends meet, to pay for college, buy a home, save for retirement. it's rooted in the nagging sense that no matter how hay work, the deck stacked against them. it's rooted in the fear they kids w
the minimum wage, equal pay for women, and in the workplace, earl -- early childhood education and pre-k have been part of his proposal all along. i was excited to hear what he said echoed. when women succeed, america succeeds, and this is our agenda. income inequality, as he pointed eroding thely middle class, which is the backbone of our economy. earlier, a representative from kentucky talked about how it is the right thing to do to improve the health of thousands of his citizens over the next decade. he also talked about it from an economic and fiscal standpoint. 50 million dollars will be injected into kentucky's economy. it will bring $800 million to the state treasury, create 17,000 jobs and support their glad toso we were very hear what he had to say at the press event and afterward. in few areas has a lot been of greater impact than in the lives americans with chronic conditions. if you had insurance that you liked before, whatever it was, it is going to be better now because of no pre-existing conditions being a barrier to your access to insurance. also removing lifetime or even on t
of color, and workers with less education. that's not particularly surprising because these are the workers who even in a robust economy have the most difficulty getting jobs in the first place for a variety of reasons, including discrimination. the very fact of long-term unemployment is affecting these workers ability to get new jobs. i know many of you are cosponsors on legislation that would prohibit discrimination against the long-term unemployed, which is a measure we would encourage you to take up as soon as we can. but the focus is on extending benefits. finally, i want to stress again the importance of renewing the program, not just because of the workers who will be affected, but for the economy overall, for the labor market overall and for our society overall. we know unemployment insurance is one of the most effective economic stimuli that we have. cbo scored this just the other day and said if the program is renewed, it could account for as much as .3% in gdp growth and an additional 300,000 jobs. if it is not renewed, it will have the opposite effect. that is very damaging to o
american education system this morning is not looking good for the next generation. in fact an international assessment of teens around the world shows u.s. students slipping even further behind. the united states ranking 26th in math scores, dropping one point since 2009, which was the last time the test was given. the u.s. is at 21st place in science, which is a drop of four spots and dropped three spots to 17th in reading. by contrast, several asian countries and cities, including japan and singapore saw their students improve significantly. education secretary arne duncan addressed the findings early this morning. >> it is a picture of educational stagnation. the brutal truth that urgent reality must serve as a wake-up call against educational complacency and low expectations. we're running in place as other high-performing countries start to lap us. >> michelle rhee is the ceo and founder of students first and joins us now. michelle, are you surprised by what this new assessment is saying about american students or do you think that this is on track, knowing what you kn
, it requires us to inform them about the health -- yes, there's a significant amount of education that goes on. as anybody can kids knows, it's hard to educate somebody who's not interested to hear what you're saying. the -- you know, it's traditionally been challenging for us to educate to the groups of people that we were able to provide health insurance to. so yeah, i see that as being a very significant challenge. >> i was back in the district last weekend. i had dinner at a restaurant. the waitress came over and recognized me, a big supporter. she told me her story, that she lost her job, now is working two jobs all because of the health care. she had lost it when they found out about this employer mandate before they delayed that, right. they had to reduce their employees. now she's working two jobs. do you have a lot of waitresses or people on your staff that are working two jobs to make ends meet? >> we have a significant number of people doing that. and we have -- what we've seen is there are a lot of people who need part-time jobs. that's because wage and job growth in permanent full
the real problem here is public education, if you have never had health insurance before, you don't know how it works and you've never applied for it and never done anything, you need to be educated and there's a whole lot of people out there who have not had health insurance before or how to use it. >> there are a lot of people who don't have computers and a lot of people are watching television about this sort of thing, so you have a real public education problem that goes with any major social change like this. it was no different for social security or for medicare or for the drug benefit under medicare. there's always a lot of education that has to be done. >> we know that there's a renewed sense of confidence certainly coming from the white house and certainly coming from democrats who have been anxious about this, and i know that as of tuesday in your state more than 175,000 residents have enrolled in health care coverage since october 1st and we know since november 14th, enrollments have increased by 55%. in your opening remarks from yesterday's committee hearing from the aca imp
's education as a pathway to success and has used the platform of college president to advance and highlight president helen drinan of simmons college. [applause] >> thank you. good evening from all of us at simmons college. we are honored to serve as the major academic sponsor for this event. when gloria steinem visited simmons last spring, she explained to us that anyone who believes in equal rights for both men and women is a feminist. surely the woman we celebrate this evening, angelina grimke, was not only an abolitionist, but also an early feminist. i would also like to suggest to that the founder of simmons college, john simmons, a true ally of women of his age, was also a feminist. at the very time in 1838 that angelina grimke was speaking to the massachusetts state legislature against slavery and for a woman's right to vote, only a mile away in the north end, john simmons was actively growing his tailoring business, employing many women here in boston and in the countryside around the city. having observed that most of his customers fell into standard sizes, he departed from custom
is it the education outcomes continue to decline when we increase federal control year after year after year but yet our outcomes continue to decline? even this week, another international poll coming out for that. why is it getting harder to start a company, find a job, pay your gas bill? why is it hard to fill up your gas and pay your cell phone? it's increasing fees and control and americans continue to get frustrated because they know this is not what we were designed to be. we're doing too many things. we've got to get back to trusting the american people, our state leaders, our local leaders and we've got to set the standard for what leadership looks like in america by our rhetoric and by our actions. we can honor people and honor each other even in our differences, but we've got to get back to doing this nation's business the way that american people in their heart know it should be done, where their voices are heard and where they get to make the decisions. with that i yield back. . the speaker pro tempore: the chair recognizes the gentleman from california, mr. miller, for five minutes. mr.
the health care. yes there's a significant amount of education that goes on and it's as anybody with kids knows it's hard to educat harder to ey that isn't interested in hearing what you have to say. you know what has traditionally been very challenging for us to educate to the groups of people that we were able to provide health insurance to so i see that as being very significant. >> when i was back in the district last weekend, i had dinner at a restaurant and the waitress came over and recognized me, a big supporter and told me her story that she lost her job and was working two jobs because of the health care that she lost when they found out about this employer mandate before they believe that, right clicks and they had to reduce their employees and now she's working two jobs. do you have other people on your staff that are working two jobs? >> we have a significant number of people doing that and what we have seen is there are a lot of people who need part-time jobs come and that is because the wage and job growth in the permanent positions hasn't been there while the cost of housi
of individual employment the administrative burden of educating and processing enrollments and declinatideclinati on's can prove almost as expensive as the coverage itself. restauranrestauran ts cannot absorb this cost and ultimately the cost will be borne by the public as a whole. the implementation threatens the safe haven of the flexible work environment for those who depend on it. thank you for the opportunity to testify before you today regarding the health care law and its effects of the business aggregation rules on small businesses like ours. i'm proud and grateful for the responsibility to serve my community in austin texas serving customers. we are committed to working with congress to find solutions that foster growth and truly benefit the communities we serve. >> thank you mr. winstanley. our final witnesses donna baker. she holds an mba from michigan state university and a b.a. in accounting from siena heights university. welcome. >> thank you chairman collins and ranking member velazguez and members of the committee. it's an honor to be here to testify on this
, the administrative urban of educating and processing the enrollments prove almost as expensive as coverage itself. absorb thiscannot cost and ultimately the cost will be warmed by the public as a whole. the implementation also threatens the safety haven of a flexible work environment by those that work on it. inc. you again for the opportunity to testify today regarding health care law and its effects on the aggregation rules for small businesses like ours. we are committed to working with congress to find solutions that foster growth and truly benefit the communities we serve. >> thank you. our final witnesses donna baker. she is a certified public accountant in adrian michigan. she holds an nba from michigan state university and a ba in accounting. mba from michigan state university and a ba in accounting. >> thank you chairman collins, ranking member alaska's and other members of the committee. it is an honor to be here to testify on this subject. i am donna baker. my own accounting firm for the last 13 years. practice in michigan, a very small rural area. firm iof owning my own also own a sma
cuts in education and unemployment benefits and health insurance for the poor. they've even gone after preschool in the state, all policies that will pretty directly hit the shoppers at the pope family stores, right? bargain town, bill's dollar store, the super 10 the super dollar, treasure mart, roses, maxway, all of the dollar stores that are part of their empire, all of the discount dollar stores that have made art pope and his family all of their many millions, which they have now spent to go after the poor in north carolina in a way that nobody has in more than 100 years. today, the state's naacp held a news conference outside the state budget office, outside art pope's office, announcing a campaign targeting mr. pope's discount stores. they're calling it a picketing campaign to educate dollar store customers about what they called the extreme and aggressive policies that they are funding by shopping at stores owned by mr. pope. >> we want to put a stop to the use of wealth to influence policies in a negative way. that's why it's not a boycott, head of the naacp and mr. pope himse
't about money. we spend plenty on money and number two is k-12 education. we are not the top 25, we are not the top 25 in k-12 education outcomes so it is not a matter of money you need to reengineer the system and i have a number of ideas about how to do that. >> maybe we will come back to that but there's a couple other bases i want to touch before i turn it over. under this broad entitlement reform, medicare is critical as you say. we also have social security. the other interesting chapter i think on what we should do to fix the social security system, say a little bit about that. >> in the scheme of things that should be easy. in the basketball and now the g8 should be a layup. you can miss the layup but on the other hand, with medicare and health care reform it is a three-point play for the opponent's basket. we have to dribble a little bit and take a few shots before we will put some points on the board. with social security we would have had competence in 1999 but for the blue dress incident. and it's not just a matter of what the reform ought to be that the process that you
. here he is. >> i'm only here because this country educated my grandfather on the g.i. bill. when my father left and my mom hit hard times trying to raise my sister and me while she was going to school, this country helped make sure we didn't go hungry. when michelle, the daughter of a shift worker at a water plant and a secretary, wanted to go to college, just like me, this country helped us afford it until we could pay it back. so what drives me as a son, a grandson, a father, as an american is to make sure that every striving, hard-working, on the mystic kid in america has the same incredible chance that this country gave me. >> this is why he was elected, right then. because that grabbed me. the idea we came here and got on the escalator and got better off in this country than we would have gotten in whatever country we came from. the g.i. bill, these are opportunities that we get in this country to move up that escalator. and he was saying i was one of the people who went up that way. we can't stop that escalator. that grabbed me. but i get the feeling sometimes they're afraid t
education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportunity. that's the real walmart. >>> tomorrow we should find out who consultants think prince george's county should roll the dice with. the bids for a casino. tracee wilkins is at one of the proposed locations in fort washington with an update. hey, tracee. >> reporter: this is a site we know is going to have a hard time tomorrow. the folks proposing this location told us they got a bad review from the folks making recommendations to the committee that will select the final site. tomorrow, we have the opportunity to see how the other two did. mgm wants a casino at national har bar. penn national at the raceway and greenwood racing pants a parx casino. they head to annapolis to win the sixth and final gaming license. the seven-member commission selecting the site had them review the proposals. the findings are confidential until tomorrow, the forth washington site had criticism. >> some about traffic, many about location.
that today or tomorrow. the operator did survive. he was injured. educated that he tried to apply the brakes, that the train was coming into the curve quickly and he tried to apply the brakes. they want to see what that operator has to say. the speed in that part of the rail should have been 30 miles an hour. the train would have needed to slow from 70-mile an hour on the straight away to that 30 miles an hour. did that happen? investigators will be back on the rails today to try to look at the rails and the crumbled cars themselves to see what they can learn from that. >> ok. lisa stark reporting to us from washington. thank you. >> metro north has been working to prevent accidents. we have a look at some prior accidents in the mta history. >> it carries more than 82 million people a year, which is the busiest in the country. it's part of new york's metropolitan transportation authority. it is a system of subways, buses and commuters trains. the deadliest crash was in 1918 when a subway driver lost control in brooklyn. the last time passengers were killed in an m.t. the a. crash was 1991 wh
experience or they will exchange out for education, for a couple of the years. a lot of people coming out of college may have part-time jobs elsewhere or going through a difficult economic time with the job market that it has recently been, how do we have the ability to get that experience? a lot of young people are looking for jobs to be able to get that experience and learn obvious job training that maybe they are not getting through their college career. what is your college background and are you still paying off college loans? caller: i am. i just finished my masters degree. i am currently employed at i has been in the job market, i have been in the professionals setting since i was 16 years old. i spent a lot of time building that experience, maybe not making as much as other people. if i am thankful i have had that ability to get that experience. i am finding a lot of young people participate in clubs and organizations, whether or not they are getting paid or getting whatever they can to get a tiny bit of experience on their resume. aret of companies out there looking for 5, 10, 10
to education. he could have stayed in his community, but he saw -- he started to see himself as an african, not just as a hoso, he started to see himself and see how the white regime was dividing people by stressing ethnic differences and he was able to overcome that. i think that's such an extraordinary thing. >> it's true. it's true. he was a courageous human being and full of the idea that he was on a journey, and he had something to do, he had a place to be, and it's fabulous to realize that there's an old spiritual, old gospel song which is i'm on my journey now, mount zion, on my journey now, mount zion, and i wouldn't take nothing, mount zion, from my journey. mount zion. he was on the journey and he knew it and he had something to do. and this is what each of us has, if we have enough courage, we can say i'm on a journey, i have a charge to keep. >> you were living in cairo with your husband, south african freedom fighter when you first met nelson mandela. i understand your husband and mandela were something of rivals, but that didn't matter to mandela. tell us about that experienc
. you went to where. >> never mind. >> oh, my god tell me all these educated people on the set what is he trying to say. >> i went to alabama so i can probably explain it better than anybody else. boy that cuts like a knife. >> tell me, what is the concept. >> we don't know how to kick a field goal when we're at the 15 yard line. >> great game. >> is anyone here? >> kicked the ball -- 59 yard kick but we don't kick a 15 yard field goal. anyway, so let me just say there were a lot of people -- i'm going to say two things so you can't jump on me after i say the first thing. okay. >> okay. >> number one i hate to be harold ford everybody told us back in 1996 when we tried to pass welfare reform and limit the number of weeks, months, years people could be on welfare that we were the most cold hearted hateful people of all time and young children would starve and grand mothers would be thrown out in the snow. we were. we were called the most heartless people of all time. we passed it over two bill clinton wes to. he signed at any time third time. most everybody said that it was a great s
to give them a better shot. martha: increase the inmum wage and increase childhood education. >> he spoke as if he hadn't been president. he spoke as if he's on the outside of his own presidency. he has been president for five years. what we have seen in the speech and what we'll continue to see is more class warfare because this is who he is. he is a leftist and essentially a socialist. so he believes in waging the class warfare. when he talks about -- when he spoke about the american dream he has a warped leftist view of that dream. he believes the state should use its to force greater income he:quality. when government do that it's essentially called communism. the american dream is built on limited government and economic freedom. policies can be put in place, growth policies, tax cuts, corporate taxes being cut to get that growth going so everybody has an equal shot at prosperity. martha: let's take a look at some of these numbers. just verbally -- 1 per when asked what's the most important issue to you? 1% of the 18-29-year-olds thought that was important. jobs, unemployment rate, 7
in the field of agriculture and agricultural education. thank you, mr. speaker and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the chair recognizes the gentleman from california, mr. waxman, for five minutes. mr. waxman: thank you very much, mr. speaker. on february 15, a small group of democratic members of the house joined together to form the safe climate caucus. we vowed to come to the house every day to talk about the defining environmental challenge of our time, climate change. today marks the 100th day we have spoken on the house floor. the safe climate caucus is composed of representatives from across this country. we come from the west coast, the east coast, the north and the south and the midwest. we come from coastal regions, urban areas and rural communities. we represent a cross-section of america. we started the safe climate caucus because of the enormous disconnect that exists between what scientists are telling us about the dangers of climate change and the conspiracy of silence and denial that exists in this house. there is a mou
to educate americans about the merits that are in obama care and meanwhile republicans every district attorney are talking about the flaws of obama care, is it these two doouling scripts this we hear every day up to the midterm election? >> i think so. i think obama care is a mess. i voted to repeal it and sent down there to try to stop. it and it is implemented porly and it is not about a website but a plan that is taking away a choice. and cutting half a trillion from medicare and a host of things that are wrong with it. i find it hypocriticical that you have staffers and senators and congressman with special perks. they have in house concierge services that allow for assistance and unlike many people in the private sector who are affected and it is only just begun as brit said himself. >> 5 million people received cancellation letters. they are angry and chances are they will not vote democratic. a year from now millions more will sign up. and maybe millions more as the administration is hoping? . and maybe they will cancel each other out and do the republicans need to articulate a
in the education community west teachers are going to start teaching to the test. but for some of the evaluations do. congresswoman titus could attest to years in academia. you don't want to test knowledge of multiple-choice exams. that is comprehensive understanding and that is what our big concern is that the american legion. thank you. >> i thank the gentleman and i thank you call today for your testimony in the work you do on found [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> this'll be our final count today. we welcome mr. tom murphy, director compensation service the veterans benefit administration, all so this sub one of the regional office. we also welcome sondra mccauley, deputy assistant general for audit evaluations of the office of inspector general department of veterans affairs. ms. mccauley is accompanied that mr. brent arronte, director of san diego benefit inspections division. we appreciate your attendance today. complete amid statements will be in the hearing record. mr. murphy, you're now recognized for five minutes. >> chairman runyan, ranking member tightness, than
. and that is what we are doing. we are putting billions into a program which will bring to them education, health, electricity and running water and sewerage and the basic immunities which you and i expect of our authorities to give us. the policy of moving the bedouin will not become law until the kin es et passes it. it is expected to happen soon. the bedouins are determined to stay. israel is unlikely to change its position. >> the nfl regular season winds down. week 13 is separating the contenders from the pretenders. real-life imitates hollywood. fans remember "fast and furious" star paul walker who died in a fiery crash. "fast and furious" not in the conversation >> paul walker's autopsy is being delayed. it's being postponed to wait for dental records. walker is known for the "fast and furious." he died in a fiery car crash outside los angeles. officials say the body was unidentifiable after being badly burnt. walker's fans are honouring his life. his latest project "fast and furious vii" will be put on hold. >> ross is here with sport. a wild day in the nfl. >> teems lighting up the scor
it will be implemented. ashington journal, live every on ing at 7:00 a.m. eastern c-span. >> the house education examines the college of affordability and the pell grant program. at 10:00 e it live a.m. eastern on c-span 3. eastern, juan manuel santos speaks at the the nal press club about economic and political situation in colombia. that's also live on c-span 3. >> as you walk in, there are tables out in front with lots of right?ts, not the -- prior to entering the gun show. how he pamphlets are about the government is trying to take away the right to own guns and the government is doing this, that. is doing obama care is terrible. those were the guys that i wanted to talk to. were the guys with the leaflets, with the ideas. like this yourself. you?id who are i said i'm a -- i'm an academic. i'm a researcher. the researcher on these rganizations and these ideas and try to understand the guys. and study the men who believe this stuff. said -- they m looked at me. they asked me questions. here's what i ok, am. i don't get it. but here's my job. i want to understand how you guys see the world. i want to u
, not intended to be this way, we prefer to have him with us. i'd like to believe that movie is going to educate the next generation about the importance of this man. maybe never get a chance to make the difference with nelson mandela, but you can make a difference just in your street, your school, maybe in your community somewhere, maybe in your organization. every single one of us have an opportunity to make a difference. that's what mandela taught us. >> he certainly did. chris dodd, thank you for joining us. >> thank you both. >> thank you, senator. our coverage will continue on the passing of nelson mandela in south africa. we'll be right back on >>> back to live pictures in johannesburg, singing outside of nelson mandela's home where he passed away this afternoon. that announcement coming an hour and 20 minutes ago. president obama commenting about a half hour ago saying he personally drew inspiration from his life, studied his words. he protested it. a man who took history in his hands. >>> d.c. mayor vincent gray extended his deepest sympathies saying mandela's diplomacy and dedication t
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